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5 Best Binoculars for Elk Hunting

Bushnell H2O Waterproof/Fogproof
 
Brand Bushnell
Color Black
Material Non slip rubber
10x50 Powerful Binoculars for Adults
 
Brand Pankoo
Color Binoculars for Adults
Water Resistance Level
Gosky 10x42 Roof Prism Binoculars for Adults
 
Brand Gosky
Color HD 10x42 binoculars
Focus Type Center Focus
Vortex Optics Crossfire HD Binoculars
 
Brand Vortex
Color BLACK
Material Aluminum
Nikon 7577 MONARCH 5 10x42 Binocular (Black)
 
Brand Nikon
Color Black
Material Rubber

Choose the Best

Customer’s Choice: the Best Rated

7 users answered this survey. Please help us improve this review!

57.14% of users selected Bushnell H2O Waterproof/Fogproof, 0.00% selected 10x50 Powerful Binoculars for Adults, 14.29% selected Gosky 10x42 Roof Prism Binoculars for Adults, 28.57% selected Vortex Optics Crossfire HD Binoculars and 0.00% selected Nikon 7577 MONARCH 5 10x42 Binocular (Black). Every month we analyze your answers and change our rating.

Have you been looking for the greatest binoculars for elk hunting? If so, you’ve come to the right place! In this guide, we will answer some of the most common questions that people have about hunting with binoculars. We’ll also provide some tips on how to choose the right pair of binoculars for your needs. So, whether you’re a novice or an expert hunter, keep reading all of the information you need to make the finest decision possible!

Binoculars for Elk Hunting

As you probably know, binoculars are a type of optical instrument that allows you to see distant objects with greater clarity. They work by using a system of lenses and mirrors to magnify the image of an object. This makes them incredibly useful for hunting, as they allow you to spot game from far away and get a better look at your surroundings.

There are many different types of binoculars on the market, but not all of them are well-suited for elk hunting. In general, you’ll want binoculars with a high magnification and a wide angle of view. This can help you spot elk from a distance and keep track of them as they move.

Bushnell H2O Roof Prism Binoculars

If you’re looking for a pair of binoculars that can stand up to the elements, then you’ll want to check out the these binoculars. They are designed with weatherproof construction, so you can use them in any weather conditions. They also feature fully multi-coated optics for superior light transmission and clarity.

 

Specifications

  • Dimensions LxWxH ‎7 x 6 x 3 inches
  • Weight‎ 709 Grams
  • Color Black
  • Material Rubber
  • Eye Relief 17 mm
  • Exit Pupil 4.2 mm / 0.165 inch
  • FoV 305/102 ft at 1000 yds/m at 1000 m
  • 10x magnification
  • 42-mm objective diameter
  • Close focus distance 12 feet
Pros
  • HD clarity
  • High quality materials
  • It is well-made and has a beautiful design that lasts a long time
  • Waterproof, fog free
  • Improved light transmission
  • Rubber armor
  • Big focus knob
  • Eye cups are twisted up

Cons
  • Can get moisture
  • Without a carrying case


10×50 Powerfull Binoculars with Large Eyepiece

Specifications

  • Dimensions 8.7 x 4 x 8.9 inch
  • Weight 1.45 pounds
  • Material Resin, Plastic
  • 10x magnification
  • 50mm objective
  • FoV 168 ft/1,000Yds
Pros
  • Powerful
  • Even in poor light, Aspherical lenses help you get a clearer picture by eliminating distortions
  • Large FoV
  • Rubber finish
  • Easy to use
  • 10 sec Focus
  • Lifetime Warranty, Customer Service

Cons
  • Lots of plastic


Gosky 10×42 Roof Prism HD Professional Binoculars

Specifications

  • Dimensions 5.75 x 2.1 x 4.96 in
  • Weight 1.54 pounds
  • Color Black
  • Porro Prism
  • Focus Type Center Focus
  • 10X magnification
  • 42mm fully multilayer-coated green coating
  • Field of view 306ft/1000yds
Pros
  • Large FoV
  • HD Superior Optics. Large intelligent BAK4 prisms
  • For maximum protection, the shock-absorbing rubber shell
  • Complete Binocular Accessories.

Cons
  • Heavy
  • Non-existent customer service


Vortex Optics Crossfire HD Binoculars

They have fantastic sharpness and brightness, and they’re designed to handle the most severe hunting situations.

Specifications

  • Dimensions LxWxH‎ 9.2 x 7.7 x 5.2 in
  • Weight‎ 23 Ounces
  • Color Green
    Material Aluminum
  • 10x magnification
  • 42mm objective
  • Roof prism
Pros
  • Crossfire HD binos
  • Increased light transmission
  • Adjustable eyecups
  • Rubber armor
  • Binoculars are adjustable to fit on a tripod
  • All conditions are covered by nitrogen purging, which keep water and fog out in all climates.
  • Waterproof

Cons
  • Clarity you have to work for

Nikon 7577 MONARCH 5 10×42 Binocular (Black)

The Nikon Monarch is one of the most popular binoculars on the market, and for good reason. They offer great features like fully multicoated optics for superior light transmission, a BaK-Four prism system for excellent brightness and clarity, and phase correction to enhance resolution and contrast.

They’re also lightweight at only 25 ounces, making them easy to carry on long hikes or backpacking trips.

Specifications

  • Dimensions 7.6 x 3.15 x 5.94 in
  • Weight 1.35 pounds
  • Color Black
  • Material Rubber
Pros
  • Brilliant FoV
  • Light transmittance. Apparent FOV: 51.3°
  • Replacement eyecups and lens caps are available, as well as a smooth center focus control knob that flips down for complete protection
  • Rubber-armored body
  • Waterproof

Cons
  • Poor strap assembly
  • Needs time for good focusing


Buyer’s Guide

Elk Hunting

Elk hunting is a bit different than deer hunting, for starters elk are much larger animals. This means that you’ll need to be able to see them from further away, and you’ll want a binocular that can zoom in so you can get a good look at the elk before deciding to take the shot. You also need to be aware of your surroundings when elk hunting since they live in groups called herds. This means that if you spook one elk, the whole herd will likely run off. For this reason, it’s important to have a binocular that is not only powerful but also compact and lightweight so you can easily carry it with you on long hikes through rugged terrain.

There are a few features that are particularly important when choosing binoculars for elk hunting. First, you’ll want a binocular with a large objective lens. This is the lens at the front of the binocular, and it determines how much light can enter the binocular.

A larger objective lens will allow you to see better in low light conditions, which is often when elk are most active.
You’ll also want a binocular with a high magnification so you can zoom in on distant animals. Finally, make sure to choose a binocular with an adjustable eyecup so you can customize it for your own eyesight.

How to Choose the Best Binoculars for Elk Hunting

When it comes to choosing the best binoculars for elk hunting, there are a few things you need to take into account.

The first thing you need to consider is what type of hunting you will be doing. If you are planning on doing long-distance shooting, then you will need a different type of binocular than if you are planning on doing close-range hunting.

How to Choose the Best Binoculars for Elk Hunting

Next, you need to think about the size and weight of the binoculars. If you are going to be carrying them around with you all day, then you will want something that is lightweight and easy to carry.

Finally, you need to think about the price. Binoculars can range in price from a few hundred dollars to a few thousand dollars. You need to find something that fits into your budget and that will meet your needs.

Binocular Features to Consider

When you are looking at different binoculars, there are a few features that you need to take into consideration.

The first feature to consider is magnification. This is how much bigger the objects will appear through the binoculars. You want to make sure that you get a pair of binoculars with enough magnification so that you can see your target clearly, but not so much that it is hard to hold them steady.

The next feature to consider is the size of the objective lens. This is the lens at the front of the binoculars and it determines how much light can enter into the binoculars. The larger the objective lens, the more light can enter, and this means that you will be able to see things more clearly.

Finally, you need to think about the type of eyepiece that the binoculars have. There are two main types of eyepieces, single lens and Porro prism. Single lens eyepieces are cheaper, but they do not offer as clear of an image as Porro prism eyepieces.

Porro prism eyepieces are a bit more expensive, but they offer a clearer image and are less likely to cause eye fatigue.

Close-Range Hunting

The most important factor when it comes to binoculars for elk hunting is the close-range performance. Most hunters will be looking at game that is no more than 300 yards away, so you don’t need the power or clarity of a long-range optic. Instead, focus on getting a pair of binoculars with a wide field of view and bright image. A good rule of thumb is to get binoculars with an objective lens (the front lenses) that is no larger than 42mm. Larger objective lenses will give you a brighter image, but they will also add weight and bulk to your optics. Another thing to consider is the magnification; most hunters find that binoculars in the eight to ten power range are more than enough for elk hunting.

One of the most important things to look for in a good pair of binoculars is image quality. This is determined by a number of factors, including the lenses, the prism type, and the coatings that are applied to the optics. The best binoculars on the market will have fully multi-coated lenses that provide bright, crisp images. They will also use high-quality prisms, such as BaK-Four prisms, which offer superior light transmission and clarity. Finally, make sure that your binoculars have some sort of anti-reflective coating; this will help to reduce glare and improve image quality.

Long-Range Viewing

If you’re serious about elk hunting, then you need a pair of binoculars that can help you spot your prey from far away. That’s why we recommend looking for a pair with a magnification of at least ten times. With this level of magnification, you’ll be able to see an elk from over half a mile away!

Long-Range Viewing

But it’s not just about the magnification. You also need to make sure that the binoculars have a wide field of view. This will allow you to scan a large area quickly and find that elusive elk hiding in the brush. Look for a pair with an objective lens of 42mm or larger.

Finally, don’t forget about image stabilization! This feature will help you keep the binoculars steady, even if your hands are shaking from excitement.

Tips for Steady Binocular Glassing

One of the most important things to consider when shopping for binoculars is how steady they will be when you glass. This is especially important for elk hunting, as you’ll often be scanning vast open expanses for hours at a time in search of that trophy bull. Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Use a tripod or monopod whenever possible. This will help immensely in reducing shake and fatigue.
  • If you don’t have a tripod or monopod, lean against something solid like a tree trunk or large rock. Anything that can help stabilize your arms will be helpful.
  • Use your body weight to your advantage. Slight shifts in your position can make a big difference in steadiness, so experiment until you find a comfortable yet effective stance.

With these tips in mind, let’s take a look at some of the best binoculars for elk hunting on the market today.

  • The Nikon Monarch HG is one of the most popular options out there, and for good reason. They offer great image quality and are very lightweight, making them easy to carry.
  • Another great option is the Vortex Viper HD. These binoculars are slightly heavier than the Nikon Monarch HG but offer even better image quality.
  • For those on a budget, the Bushnell Legend Ultra HD is a great choice. They don’t quite match up to the other two options in terms of image quality, but they’re still a great value for the price. [1]

Binocular Prisms

One of the most important parts of a binocular is the prism. The prism is what allows the binocular to magnify the image and create an erect, or upright image.

Porro and Roof Prisms

There are two types of prisms used in binoculars, Porro and Roof.

Porro prism binoculars have offset objectives which create a three-dimensional image. These are typically less expensive than roof prism binoculars but offer poorer light transmission.

Roof prism have the objectives aligned with the eyepieces which make for a more compact design. These usually cost more but provide better light transmission.

When choosing between the two, it really comes down to personal preference and what you will be using your binoculars for.

If you plan on doing any low light hunting or glassing, then roof prism would be your best bet.
If you are looking for a more budget-friendly option or don’t plan on using them in low light conditions, then Porro prism binoculars would be a better choice.

Roof Prisms vs Porro Prism

Roof prism binoculars are more expensive, but they offer a number of advantages. For one, they’re usually smaller and more compact than porro prism. They’re also generally better sealed against the elements, making them more water and fog proof.

Roof prism binoculars tend to have better optics, due to the fact that the light path is shorter and less complicated. Porro prism binoculars are usually cheaper and offer a wider FoV. They’re also typically easier to hold and use for extended periods of time.

So, what type of binocular is appropriate for elk hunting? Well, it really depends on your needs and preferences. If you’re looking for a compact binocular that can withstand tough conditions, then roof prisms are probably your best bet. However, if you’re looking for a binocular with a wide FoV and don’t mind sacrificing some compactness, then porro prisms might be the way to go. Ultimately, it’s up to you to decide which type of binocular is best for your elk hunting needs. [2]

How to Use Binoculars

Using binoculars for elk hunting can be extremely helpful, especially if you are trying to spot game from a distance. Here are some tips:

  • First, make sure that you have the right type of binoculars. There are many various types of binoculars on the market, and not all of them are well suited for elk hunting. You will want to look for a pair of binoculars that is specifically designed for this purpose.
  • Second, practice focusing your binoculars accurately. This is important because it will allow you to see game more clearly. Many people make the mistake of not focusing their binoculars properly, and as a result, they miss out on seeing game that is far away.
  • Third, practice using your binoculars before you go elk hunting. This will help you get used to the feel of the binoculars and how to use them effectively. If you can, try to find a place where there are plenty of elk so that you can get some practice in before actually going on a hunt.
  • Fourth, when you are using your binoculars, be sure to hold them steady. This is important because if you move your binoculars around too much, it will be difficult to spot game that is far away. You may need to use a tripod or some other type of support to keep your binoculars steady.
  • Fifth, when you are looking for game, scan the area slowly and methodically. Don’t just look in one direction. By scanning the area slowly, you will be more likely to spot game that is hiding.
  • Finally, don’t forget to take breaks often. If you stare at your binoculars for too long, your eyes will become tired and it will be harder to spot game. Take a break every few minutes to rest your eyes, and you’ll be able to hunt longer and more effectively.

Adjust the Eyecup

One of the most significant aspects of using binoculars is getting a clear, crisp image. If you wear glasses, this can be a challenge. The eyecups on most binoculars can be adjusted to accommodate for glasses, however. Simply twist the eyecups until they are in the proper position. This will ensure that you see a clear image without having to remove your glasses.

Adjust the Eyecup

The above tips should help you get the most out of your binoculars when elk hunting. By following these tips, you will be able to spot game from a distance and make your hunt more successful.

Adjust the distance to fit your eyes (interpupillary distance)

One of the most important things to do when you first get your binoculars is to adjust the distance between the lenses (interpupillary distance) to fit your eyes.

Most binoculars have a mechanism for doing this, but if yours don’t, simply hold them up to your eyes and move them closer together or further apart until you see a single circular field of view.

Once you’ve done this, take a look at something in the distance and fine-tune the focus until it’s as clear as possible.

Focusing (Diopter Adjustment)

The diopter adjustment is the knob on the right side of the binocular (as you are looking through them). This adjusts the focus for your right eye. Leave the image for your right eye alone after you’ve focused it; instead, use only the center focus knob to modify both barrels at once.

The sweet spot for most people is somewhere in the middle of its range, but it really varies from person to person. If you set it too close or too far away from this “sweet spot”, one eye will be in focus and one will be out. You want to avoid this if possible because it can cause a lot of eye strain.

If you wear glasses, you need to factor that in as well. Most binoculars have some kind of eyecup that you can twist up or down.

Some binoculars also come with a feature called “eye relief”. This is the distance between your eye and the ocular lens where you still see the full field of view. If you wear glasses, make sure that the binoculars you choose have at least 14mm of eye relief. This will help ensure that you see the full field of view without vignetting.

Central Focusing Binoculars

There are two types of focusing mechanisms for binoculars: central focusing and individual eyepiece focus. Central focusing is the most common type, and it is the kind that we recommend for most people. With this type of binocular, there is a single focus knob in the center of the binocular that adjusts both barrels at once.

This has a few advantages. First, it is generally faster to adjust the focus with a single knob than it is to adjust two knobs (one for each eye). Second, it is easier to keep both barrels in perfect alignment if they are focused with a single knob.

The only real downside to central focusing binoculars is that they can be more difficult to use if you are wearing glasses. This is because you have to adjust the focus for your right eye, and then the focus for your left eye, and then the focus for your right eye again…you get the idea.

Individual Focusing Binoculars

The other type of focusing mechanism is individual eyepiece focus. With this type of binocular, each eyepiece has its own focus knob. This can be a bit more cumbersome to use, but it does have one big advantage: it is much easier to use if you are wearing glasses.

This is because you can focus each eyepiece independently. So, if you have one eye that is more nearsighted than the other, you can simply adjust the focus on that eye until it is clear.

The downside to individual eyepiece focus binoculars is that they are generally not as well aligned as central focusing binoculars. This means that there is a greater chance of getting “double vision” or seeing two images instead of one.

If you plan on using individual eyepiece focus binoculars, we recommend that you try them out before you buy them to make sure that they will work for you. [3]

Major Considerations When Purchasing Binoculars

There are a few key factors you’ll want to keep in mind when shopping for binoculars for elk hunting. First and foremost, you’ll want to make sure that the optic is powerful enough for your needs.

Magnification and Objective Lens Diameter

Binoculars are typically described using two numbers, such as “12×50.” The first number is the magnification, or how many times an object will appear closer than it does with the naked eye. The second number is the objective lens diameter, which is a measure of how much light the binocular can gather.

A higher magnification allows you to see your game at a longer distance, but it will also make it more difficult to keep the image steady. A larger objective lens will let in more light, making it easier to see in low-light conditions like early morning or late evening.

So, what’s the ideal combination of magnification and objective lens diameter? That depends on a few factors, including the type of game you’re hunting and the typical range at which you’ll be shooting.

For elk hunting, many experts recommend a binocular with a magnification of at least 12x and an objective lens diameter of 40mm or more.

If you think you might do some long-range shooting, you might want to consider a higher magnification like 15x or even 20x. Just keep in mind that binoculars with a higher magnification will be heavier and more difficult to hold steady.

Field of View

Another important consideration is the field of view. This is the width of the area you can see through the binocular, measured in feet at 1000 yards.

A wider field of view is better for tracking moving targets and scanning an area for game. But a narrower field of view will give you a higher level of detail, making it easier to pick out antlers or other distinguishing features.

Again, there’s no one-size-fits-all answer here. It really depends on your hunting style and what you’re most likely to use the binoculars for.

If you think you’ll mostly be using them for long-range glassing, then you might want to sacrifice some field of view for a higher magnification. But if you do a lot of still-hunting or stalking, then a wider field of view might be more important.

Field of view is also affected by the eyepiece design. Binoculars with a wide field of view typically have a “Porro prism” design, while those with a narrower field of view usually have a “roof prism” design.

Lenses

The quality of the lenses and prism is another important factor to consider. In general, you’ll want binoculars with fully multi-coated lenses. This means that all of the air-to-glass surfaces have multiple layers of anti-reflective coating.

It’s also important to make sure that the prism is made from high-quality glass. BAK-four prisms are typically considered to be the best, but they’re also more expensive.

Eye Relief

Eye relief is the distance between your eye and the eyepiece lens where you’ll still be able to see the full field of view. This is important for two reasons.

First, it allows you to use binoculars with glasses or sunglasses. And second, it makes it easier to hold the binoculars steady, which is especially important at higher magnifications.

As a general rule, you’ll want a minimum of 15mm of eye relief. But if you wear glasses or sunglasses, you might need 20mm or more.

There are also “compact” binoculars on the market that have shorter tubes and less eye relief. These are typically designed for birdwatching or other applications where weight and size are more important than image quality.

What the Numbers Mean

When you’re shopping for binoculars, you’ll see a number like “12×50” or “20×60.” The first number is the magnification, while the second is the objective lens diameter.

So, a 12×50 binocular has a magnification of 12x and an objective lens diameter of 50mm. And a 20×60 binocular has a magnification of 20x and an objective lens diameter of 60mm.

It’s also important to pay attention to the field of view. This will be listed as either degrees (like “66°”) or feet at 1000 yards (“420 ft”).

And finally, make sure to check the eye relief. This will be listed in millimeters (“18 mm“).

Twilight Factor

The “twilight factor” is a measure of how much light the binocular can gather. It’s calculated by multiplying the objective lens diameter by the magnification.

So, a 12×50 binocular has a twilight factor of 600 (12 x 50). And a 20×60 binocular has a twilight factor of 1200 (20 x 60).

Twilight Factor

The higher the twilight factor, the better the binocular will perform in low-light conditions like dawn and dusk. This makes them ideal for hunting elk or other big game animals that tend to be most active at these times.

Just keep in mind that binoculars with a high twilight factor will also be bigger and heavier.

There are also “night vision” binoculars on the market that use infrared technology to amplify even the smallest amount of light. These can be expensive, but they’re worth it if you do a lot of hunting in low-light conditions. [4]

What to Look for In Binoculars for Elk Hunting

When looking for the best binoculars for elk hunting, there are a few key factors you’ll want to keep in mind.

A Clear Picture

One of the most important things to look for in a pair of binoculars is a clear picture. You’ll want to make sure that there is minimal distortion around the edges of the lenses, and that the image is bright and crisp.

Another important factor to consider is the magnification power of the binoculars. For elk hunting, you’ll likely want a pair of binoculars with at least a ten times magnification power. This will allow you to get a good look at your target from a distance.

Finally, you’ll want to make sure that the binoculars are comfortable to use. Look for a pair that is lightweight and easy to hold steady, even when you’re wearing gloves. And be sure to try out different pairs before you make your final decision.

A Reasonable Zoom

If you’re going to be doing a lot of long-distance elk hunting, then you need a binocular with a reasonable zoom range. A good rule of thumb is to get binocular with at least a 20x magnification. This will allow you to see your target clearly, without having to strain your eyes.

A Comfortable Weight

One thing to keep in mind is that you’ll be carrying these around a lot, so make sure you find a pair that won’t break your back.

You also want to make sure the eye cups are comfortable. Some people prefer rubber eyecups while others prefer twist-up eyecups. It’s really a matter of personal preference, so try out a few different pairs before making your final decision.

Finally, make sure the neck strap is adjustable and comfortable. You don’t want it to be too tight or too loose.

Intuitive Adjustability

One thing you should notice about the Binoculars is that they must feel good in your hands. The eyecups are soft and pliable, yet firm enough to maintain their shape. The focusing mechanism is buttery smooth, making it easy to fine-tune your image. And the diopter adjustment is right where your thumb falls naturally, so you can make on-the-fly adjustments without having to take your binoculars out of commission.

All of these factors come together to create a pair of binoculars that are extremely user-friendly, even for those who have never used a pair before.

What is The Best Lens Size

The most popular lens size for binoculars used while elk hunting is 42mm. This size allows you to have a wide field of view, while still providing enough magnification to see your target clearly.

If you plan on doing a lot of hiking while elk hunting, then you might want to consider a smaller lens size such as 32mm or 30mm. These sizes will be lighter and easier to carry around with you all day.

However, keep in mind that the smaller the lens, the less light that will be able to enter the binoculars. This means that images may appear darker and less clear than they would with a larger lens size.

Waterproof and Fog-Proof Binoculars

One of the most important features you should look for in binoculars is that they are waterproof and fog-proof. This is especially important if you plan on hunting in wet or cold conditions. Waterproof binoculars will keep your lenses from fogging up, and they will also protect them from rain, snow, and other moisture. Fog-proof binoculars have special coatings on the lenses that prevent them from fogging up in humid or cold conditions.

Balance Your Best Binocular for Elk Hunting Needs

Weighing your needs is the best place to start when selecting a pair of binoculars for elk hunting. You may prioritize low-light performance over compactness, or decide that image stabilization is worth the extra cost.

Think about the conditions in which you’ll be hunting most often. If you hunt early mornings or evenings, low-light capability will be key. If you’re planning on carrying your binoculars long distances, weight and size become more important factors.

There’s no single answer for what makes the best binoculars for elk hunting. The right choice depends on your specific needs and preferences. By taking the time to consider what’s most important to you, you can narrow down your options and find the perfect pair of binoculars for your next hunt.


FAQ

What binocular magnification is best for hunting?

There is no definitive answer to this question, as it depends on the type of hunting you will be doing and your personal preferences. For example, if you are planning on doing a lot of long-range shooting, you may want to consider a binocular with a higher magnification. On the other hand, if you will be doing mostly close-range hunting, a lower magnification may be more suitable. Ultimately, it is important to choose a binocular that provides you with the level of detail and clarity that you need for successful hunting. [5]

How do I choose the best binoculars for hunting?

There are a few things to consider when choosing the best binoculars for elk hunting. The most important factor is magnification. You’ll want a pair of binoculars that have at least ten times magnification. This will help you spot an elk from far away, and also see small details like antlers.

Another thing to consider is the size and weight of the binoculars. If you’re going to be carrying them around all day, you’ll want something that’s not too heavy or bulky. Another factor to keep in mind is the field of view. A wider field of view will make it easier to find game, but can also make objects appear smaller.

Finally, think about what kind of budget you have. There are binoculars available at all different price points, so it’s important to find something that fits your needs and budget. [6]

Are 10×50 binoculars good for hunting?

In general, yes. A lot of hunters prefer the added power that comes with binoculars in the 50mm range. The larger lenses also do a better job of gathering light, which is especially important at dawn and dusk when elk are most active.

However, keep in mind that bigger isn’t always better.
If you’ll be carrying your binoculars for long distances, you might want to consider something lighter and more compact.

What binocular magnification is best for elk hunting?

Most hunters agree that elk hunting binoculars should have at least a ten power magnification. This will enable you to see an elk at 400 yards as if it were only 40 yards away. Some binoculars have even higher magnifications, but these are not always necessary and can be more difficult to hold steady. [7]

In general, the bigger the objective lens, the better. However, large binoculars can be heavy and cumbersome, so you’ll need to decide what’s most important to you.

Another factor to consider is whether you want a fixed or zoom power scope. Zoom power scopes are more versatile, but they can be more difficult to use because you have to keep readjusting the power. Fixed power scopes are simpler to use but don’t offer as much flexibility.

Useful Video: 10 Best Elk Hunting Binoculars – Tactical Gears Lab

Conclusion

Overall, the best binoculars for elk hunting are those that offer a good combination of magnification, light gathering ability, and image quality. While there are many different models on the market to choose from, we believe that the ones listed above represent some of the best values currently available.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this guide and that it’s helped you in your search for the perfect pair of binoculars for your next elk hunt. Happy hunting! And as always, thanks for reading!


References:

  1. https://www.binocularsguru.com/best-elk-hunting-binoculars/
  2. https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/high-tech-gadgets/binoculars-buying-guide1.htm
  3. https://www.bestbinocularsreviews.com/blog/how-to-use-binoculars-12/
  4. https://www.businesstoday.in/magazine/living-tech/story/binoculars-features-specifications-37049-2012-10-13
  5. https://argalioutdoors.com/advice/how-pick-best-size-binoculars-big-game-hunting-part-1
  6. https://www.themeateater.com/hunt/gear-hunt/what-you-need-to-know-about-hunting-binoculars
  7. https://argalioutdoors.com/advice/how-pick-best-size-binoculars-big-game-hunting-part-2#